We love and care for your canals and rivers, because everyone deserves a place to escape.

Fishing for rudd (Scardinius erythrophthalmus) is a skilled art. Find out the best time and place to land a catch of this attractive fish.

Rudd, courtesy of Jack Perks Rudd, courtesy of Jack Perks
"The canals in the south of England such as the Kennet & Avon produce specimen size fish." Carl Nicholls, fisheries & angling manager

Appearance: coppery golden in colour with bright blood red fins and an upturned mouth for surface feeding.

British record: 4lb 10oz (British record committee 2015)

Lateral line scale count: 40-55 (this is the dark row of scales along the central length of the fishes body).

Lifespan: 8 to 14 years

We like rudd because they are considered by many to be most beautiful of the cyprinid fishes

How to catch a rudd

As a primarily surface feeding fish, rudd can be difficult catch in numbers and fishing for rudd is a skilful art. Evenings tend to be the best time to catch rudd, which can usually be seen dimpling at the surface on the far side of the canal near to overhanging vegetation. A fine line and small hooks is the most sensible approach with the best baits being maggots, floating casters or bread punch.

Where to catch a rudd

Present in most waterbodies although rarely common, the canals in the south of England such as the Kennet & Avon produce specimen size fish. The Grantham Canal also holds plenty of rudd.

Last date edited: 3 September 2015