We love and care for your canals and rivers, because everyone deserves a place to escape.

Enforcement

This page is all about enforcement - why we do it, who does it and how you, as a boater, can get help. Ultimately, all of the work we do needs to be paid for somehow. Some of the money comes from Government, some from grants and donations, and some from the property and investments we own. A large chunk – nearly a quarter - comes from boaters and waterway businesses.

View of rear of moored boats in Welton Hyde Marina Welton Hyde Marina, Daventry

Caring for our canals and rivers is a costly business, so we think it’s important that everyone pays their way. Between 1 April 2014 and 31 March 2015 we spent a total of over £130m on our charitable activities, notably the repair and maintenance of our waterways. We cleared overgrowth from over 97 miles of canal bank and undertook dredging on 50 miles of waterway, removing 130,000 tonnes of silt.

All of the work we do needs to be paid for somehow. Some of the money comes from Government, some from grants and donations, and some from the property and investments we own. A large chunk – nearly a quarter - comes from boaters and waterway businesses.

To ensure we can continue to attract the income we need to spend on protecting and maintaining the waterways we care for, we have to take steps to safeguard our income and make sure everyone enjoying the use of the water for boating is paying their way.

Tackling licence evasion

We have an enforcement team that is out and about on, or by, our canals and rivers to tackle licence evasion. This is the seventh year in a row that the rate has stayed below 5%.

Another essential part of the enforcement role is to ensure fairness for all boaters by making sure that people stick to mooring times and cruise according to their licence Terms & Conditions – we want to give the maximum number of boaters the opportunity to explore and enjoy as much of the network as they want.

When boats stay longer than they’re allowed at a particular spot or area it can prevent others visiting and may also be an indication that the boater has encountered a problem which is preventing them from moving.

If we ever do have to take action we try to give boaters as much time as possible to get in touch with us and explain their situation. If you're interested, we've laid out exactly what steps we take in this handy download: CC Monitoring Process

Welfare officer

An additional, crucial, part of the team’s role is to support boaters who are in need and, for whatever reason, are struggling to follow the rules. The team have always worked closely with boaters to help find ways to assist them where they can – for example agreeing to longer stay times when having medical treatment.

We have expert advice on hand in the form of welfare officer, Sean Williams, who helps the team find the best support to suit a particular boater’s needs.

With over 2,000 miles to care for, the team is split into regions to cover the network – each region has a supervisor who manages a team of officers, shown in this map, and data collectors.

If you’d like to contact one of the supervisors you'll find their details below, for example, if you’re concerned about a particular boat, or want some advice about our guidance. Alternately you'll find the details of the enforcement officer for your region on this map.

Useful downloads

Last date edited: 27 July 2016