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News article created on 30 November 2016

Future looking bright for Birmingham's famous Roundhouse

The Trust and National Trust have had their plans to restore the Grade II* listed Roundhouse in Birmingham and transform it into an activity and enterprise hub approved by Birmingham City Council’s planning committee.

Birmingham Roundhouse Birmingham Roundhouse

The project, which is due to start next year and was unanimously supported by the planning committee, will create a gateway for people to explore Birmingham’s fantastic natural and built heritage by foot, bike and boat. As well as offering a base from which to explore the canal network, the project, which has secured development funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund, also includes the provision for a cycle hire and repair workshop, volunteering opportunities and a shared working space for conservation organisations.

Built in 1874 by the Birmingham Corporation the Roundhouse was originally used as stables and stores. Designed by local architect W.H. Ward the horseshoe shaped building is a rare and beautiful Birmingham landmark.

Fantastic building 

Stuart Mills, from the Trust, said: "The Roundhouse is a fantastic building right in the heart of Birmingham and we are delighted to have this opportunity to bring it back to life. Once restored the building will become an important part of the regeneration of Birmingham’s waterside whilst also maintaining the building’s character and historic value."

Lizzie Hatchman, General Manager for the National Trust in Birmingham, said: "Budget cuts and housing pressure mean Birmingham’s local historic buildings and green spaces will be increasingly under threat. Safeguarding the places that have shaped the character and landscape of our city for the people of Birmingham matters. Bringing the Roundhouse back to life is an opportunity for two national charities, partners and local volunteers to pull together to protect the past for future generations to enjoy and learn from."