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News article created on 22 September 2016

Calling young people - become the first youth ambassadors for Pontcysyllte Aqueduct and Canal World Heritage Site

Calling young people aged 13 – 25. Would you like to volunteer with the Trust as a World Heritage Site youth ambassador to promote the amazing Pontcysyllte Aqueduct and Llangollen Canal?

Ponty Valley

The Trust is looking for young people with an interest in their local area and a few hours to spare. This is a new role which could involve youth ambassadors engaging with visitors, leading walks, attending meetings and general promotion of the World Heritage Site.

The youth ambassadors course is accredited. The first session will be held at the Trevor Basin Visitor Centre on Saturday 8 October, 10am – 5.30pm, and will include a boat trip across the world famous aqueduct.

Kate Lynch, a heritage advisor with the Trust, explained: "We are very keen to recruit enthusiastic young people who can become passionate ambassadors in promoting this important World Heritage Site to the next generation.

"No experience is necessary – just an interest in local history and an outgoing personality. This is also something that looks great on CVs and is a way of gaining useful work experience. If you love your local area and want to give something back – this is a brilliant way to do it."

For more information and to reserve a place on 8 October, please email pontcysyllte@wrexham.gov.uk.

The World Heritage Site covers an 11 mile stretch of the Llangollen Canal and includes the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct, Horseshoe Falls, Chirk Aqueduct and canal engineering structures such as cuttings, embankments and tunnels.

The centrepiece, the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct, was constructed by famous canal engineers Thomas Telford and William Jessop between 1795 and 1805. Measuring a record-breaking 1,000 feet long and 126 feet high, the aqueduct carries the beautiful, rural Llangollen Canal over the River Dee valley. A cast iron trough, which holds 1.5 million litres of water, is supported by 18 slender sandstone piers and 19 elegant arches, each with a 45 feet span.