We love and care for your canals and rivers, because everyone deserves a place to escape.

Bank Hall Pit

This area was once the home to Bank Hall Pit and included a dry dock for boat maintenance, a canal depot, two wharves, a separate branch of canal and a ginny track.

Bank Hall Colliery painting, 1962 by Albert Lord - three miners by buildings Bank Hall Colliery 1962 by Albert Lord

Pit stop

This area was once the home to Bank Hall Pit and included a dry dock for boat maintenance, a canal depot, two wharves, a separate branch of canal and a ginny track. Can you see the evidence? The area is now sloping parkland and if you are able to stop and spend some time here you will find evidence of its past.

Listen to local historian Steve Chappels talk about how much this area has changed since he was a boy

Pit Poetry

Bank Hall Pit Top – Burnley  Written by Jan Ferrierr

On Bank Hall Pit Top, above the River Brun
Along the aqueduct, the narrow boats run
Past derelict factory and ghost satanic mill
And the colliery wheel that now stands still,
Fast, in its iron mountings, a permanent monument
To a bygone age when matchstick men spent
Back breaking shifts digging the blue black coal.
The parkland grass is now dug by the velvet mole.
Where the shuttle flew, now flies the solitary magpie.
He brings no news of joy.
Where the bobbins hummed, now hums the busy honey bee.
He brings no work for man or boy.
No smoking chimney stack obliterates the blue sky.
Now in its eyrie rim there grows a stunted tree.
Down by the dole, where all the people go,
Their pace once hurried, now is slow,
As winding up the hill they go.
To Bank Hall Pit Top, above the River Brun,
To the aqueduct, where the narrow boats run,
Bound for a gleaming new Jerusalern,
That has already bypassed most of them.
A rudder holds its wake like a trailing tattered hem,
And Autumn's first wind shakes the red rose from its stem.

Football fever

What has football got to do with Bank Hall Pit?

Steve Chappels talks about some of the very talented miners who worked there

Black gold

Coal developed into the main cargo on the Leeds and Liverpool canal largely due to the eruption in mill numbers along the canal. Bank Hall pit supplied much of Burnley’s coal and became the town’s largest and grandest pit. The abundance of coal in Burnley, the growth of the canal transport system and the rise in canal-side mills all combined to create a prosperous and winning partnership.

Wildlife Watch – Birds

The canal is a haven for birds and you are likely to spot dippers, moorhen, coots, swifts, swallows and house martins depending on the time of year. From the heron, which is common on this stretch to the very striking waxwing, you never know what you might find.

Last date edited: 21 July 2015