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Site of Five Rise farmhouse

This charming 18th century farmhouse appears in the earliest drawing of the Five Rise Locks dating from around 1777.

Black and white photo of Five Rise farmhouse Five Rise farmhouse

It was ruined for many years and was demolished in 2006. If you look closely and explore among the brambles you can make out the walls and even see some of the plaster mouldings where the floor and walls meet.

David and Brian Airey, who lived at the top of the Five Rise Locks as young boys during World War II, recall the farmer who they knew as ‘Fred the Egg’. Fred sold eggs to the boatmen, from a basket along the towpath. He warned the boys that there was an unexploded bomb in the middle of the bog!

David Airey talks about playing on the farm.

Overgrown Five Rise farmhouse before it was demolished

Five Rise Farmhouse just prior to demolition in 2006.

Ink drawing of Five Rise Locks in 1777 showing original lock keeper's cottage

Drawing by Johann Hogrewe made in 1777 showing the Five Rise Locks and original lock keeper’s cottage top right.

Details of Bingley to Saltaire trail app

 Bingley Heritage Awareness Project:

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Last date edited: 21 July 2015